Social media marketing strategies during COVID-19

With so many people working from home during the pandemic, there has been a surge in web traffic. This has allowed businesses to re-evaluate their social media strategy, identify their brand’s foundation and voice, and better connect with customers using measurable efforts.

With so many people working from home during the pandemic, there has been a surge in web traffic. This has allowed businesses to re-evaluate their social media strategy, identify their brand’s foundation and voice, and better connect with customers using measurable efforts.

Entering 2020, one may have just begun to understand their social audience, identified active time slots, designed content to post for maximum engagement, and probably planned and scheduled campaigns. Then the pandemic hit, postponing or even cancelling many social media programs. 

However, with so many people working from home, there has been a surge in web traffic, and this has allowed businesses to re-evaluate their social media strategy, identify their brand’s foundation and voice, and better connect with customers using measurable efforts. Clearly, COVID-19 has changed just about everything, but change is not always a bad thing.

So, what can a sign business do?

Content to avoid

Businesses should start by evaluating their current strategy and assessing their content—what they can move forward with versus what needs to be put on hold. Companies should avoid certain types of content including:

1. Any posts that focus on large gatherings or parties: Brands do not want to run the risk of appearing ignorant and promoting contact in an era of social distancing. Wording is important, and companies should refrain from using taglines that promote get-togethers, human contact, or even travel. Businesses must ensure all social media images or videos promote the 2-m (6-ft) social distancing rule as well. It
is easy to rely upon the collection of brand imagery for social media but, in doing so, the company may unwittingly be sending an inappropriate message.

2. Posts that make light of the situation: What one may find humorous and pokes fun at the world’s current situation, may be offensive to the audience. This is the time to stand in solidarity because everyone is #inthistogether.

3. COVID-19 misinformation or sharing false statements: If businesses want to share information related to the pandemic on a social media channel, they must fact check first. If one chooses to share any news, it is recommended they only share information that relates to the business, industry, or audience to stay focused on the brand. People are inundated with crisis news, so sharing relative and useful content that complements one’s business is key to ensuring digital messages are heard and paid attention to.

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