Preserving history using modern techniques at Loggers Grill

The letters were made from old tools and pieces of metal  to create the wording ‘Loggers Grill.’

The letters were made from old tools and pieces of metal to create the wording ‘Loggers Grill.’

The challenge, however, was to make the letters stand out, rather than sit flat against a backer panel. To solve this, the team mounted these pieces onto the faces of 254- x 127-mm (10- x 5-in.) thick aluminum channel letters, which created a much stronger three-dimensional look. In doing so, the sign became more eye-catching while continuing to remain true to its original theme. The letters were also made to look worn and mildly rusted to retain the sign’s vintage feel.

Next, corrugated steel panels were cut into shape to resemble three mountain peaks. The cut panels were then flush mounted to the existing wood trusses above the Loggers Grill sign with hidden fasteners.

The overall width of the finished steel panels was 5842 mm (230 in.). The centre mountain’s peak reached a height of approximately 1575 mm (62 in.), while the mountains on either side were 1092 mm (43 in.) tall. The steel panel was weathered to give it a mildly rusted appearance—as if it had been exposed to the elements—so it blended in with its natural surroundings.

To create a rustic look, the team used 25.4- x 152.4-mm (1- x 6-in.) vertical cedar wood slats and stained them in varying colours—such as Cordovan Brown and Natural Sequoia—to give each piece a somewhat unmatched look. They were then cut into five smaller rigid peaks and stood off the steel panels with 38.1-mm (1.5-in.) spacers. This added even more depth to the sign.

To create a rustic look, the team used 25.4- x 152.4-mm (1- x 6-in.) vertical cedar wood slats and stained them in varying colours—such as Cordovan Brown and Natural Sequoia—to give each piece a somewhat unmatched look.

To create a rustic look, the team used 25.4- x 152.4-mm (1- x 6-in.) vertical cedar wood slats and stained them in varying colours—such as Cordovan Brown and Natural Sequoia—to give each piece a somewhat unmatched look.

The peaks were 1168 mm (46 in.) tall so the steel and wood did not overshadow each other. The wood peaks did not run parallel to the corrugated steel mountains. Instead, they were cut in a way so their troughs were centred with the steel panel’s peaks, creating the look of three mountains with the body of the mountain being slatted wood and the snowy peak of the mountain being corrugated metal. Lastly, 4.8-mm (0.18-in.) black steel edging was used around the border to cover the wooden ends.

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The reclaimed antique wood saw from the previous sign was used to give the finishing touch to the new sign. This was another chance for the sign shop to pay homage to the former sign and, to do so, the team adhered it horizontally under the aluminum channel letters, which created an underlining effect.

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