Monument to honour students of Manitoba residential school

The Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group recently broke ground on a monument dedicated to the victims and survivors of the former residential school in Winnipeg, Man. Photo by AMC Communications

The Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group recently broke ground on a monument dedicated to the survivors of the former residential school in Winnipeg, Man. Photo by AMC Communications

The Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group recently broke ground on a monument dedicated to the survivors of the former residential school in Winnipeg, Man.

Intended as part of a gathering place, the monument will feature a circle of metal markers engraved with the Indigenous names of the 83 communities. Students’ names will also be engraved in paving stones throughout the site, and informational panels will provide further history and a background.

Supporters of the project include the government of Canada, the province of Manitoba, the city of Winnipeg, the Canadian Centre for Child Protection, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Westworth United Church, and several other community partners.

The legacy group has undertaken work on the site, to ensure it can be done in their own way and at their own pace. They aim to have it open to the public on Sept. 30, for the second National Day of Truth and Reconciliation. The group will also organize and host events at the site.

“There can be no reconciliation without the truth being heard first. By helping to create this place, Canada is making sure more people will learn about what Survivors like me experienced and honour our humanity and resiliency. This learning will be a good step on the journey toward reconciliation,” says Elder Betty Ross, survivor of the residential school system and member of the Assiniboia Residential School Legacy Group.

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